Trials

  • March 04, 2024

    Ind. Man Found Guilty In Houston For Role In $7M Scam

    A federal jury in Houston found an Indianapolis man guilty Monday of money laundering and conspiracy to launder money for his role in a $7 million financial scheme that involved a network of individuals who impersonated bank employees

  • March 04, 2024

    H-2A Farmworkers Seek Partial Win Ahead Of Wage Trial

    A certified class of migrant sugarcane farmworkers under the H-2A visa program asked an Arkansas federal judge to partly rule in their favor in a wage dispute set for an April jury trial, saying payroll records indicate the farm labor contractor shorted them $410,089 and that the owner should be held liable.

  • March 04, 2024

    'Rust' Prop Supplier Denies Giving Armorer Live Rounds

    A gun and ammunition prop supplier for "Rust" told a New Mexico state jury Monday that he was not responsible for live rounds that ended up on the set of the Western film, potentially bolstering the state's involuntary manslaughter case against armorer Hannah Gutierrez-Reed.

  • March 04, 2024

    Deported Man Seeks Mass. Justices' OK For Zoom Retrial

    A man deported to the Dominican Republic due to convictions that were later vacated asked Massachusetts' high court on Monday for permission to log in via Zoom to the government's retrial of the same charges because there's no legal way for him to attend the trial physically.

  • March 04, 2024

    Trials Group Of The Year: Covington

    Covington & Burling LLP's trials group successfully represented major companies such as TikTok, The Hain Celestial Co., McKesson and Merck last year in courts across the country, earning the firm a spot among Law360's 2023 Trials Groups of the Year.

  • March 04, 2024

    Justices Won't Review Ex-Merrill Lynch Traders' Fraud Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday it will not take up an appeal from two former Merrill Lynch traders who were convicted in Chicago federal court of spoofing the precious metals market.

  • March 04, 2024

    JetBlue, Spirit Nix $3.8B Deal After Court Block

    JetBlue Airways said Monday that it has reached an agreement with Spirit Airlines to end their planned $3.8 billion merger, after the U.S. Department of Justice convinced a Massachusetts federal court to block the deal earlier this year.

  • March 04, 2024

    Trump's Former Finance Chief Pleads Guilty To Perjury

    Allen Weisselberg, the longtime former financial chief of Donald Trump's real estate business empire, admitted Monday to lying under oath in the New York attorney general's civil fraud case as part of a plea deal to serve five months in jail.

  • March 01, 2024

    Jury Awards Midwest Energy $57M On Refined Coal Patents

    A Delaware federal jury on Friday awarded Midwest Energy Emissions Corp. more than $57 million after finding that numerous affiliated companies willfully infringed its patents on technology for refining coal to reduce mercury in emissions from power plants.

  • March 01, 2024

    Blockbuster Drug Sales Help Keep J&J Patent Alive

    Johnson & Johnson has persuaded a federal judge in Wilmington, Delaware, to rule in its favor in a patent case seeking to prevent a startup from launching a competing line of schizophrenia drugs, in part because Invega Sustenna has made the pharmaceutical giant billions of dollars.

  • March 01, 2024

    DOJ Defends Broad Enron Law Reading In Capitol Riot Suit

    A federal law that makes it a crime to "corruptly" obstruct an official proceeding was intended as a "catchall offense" and can be used to prosecute participants in the Jan. 6, 2021, riot at the U.S. Capitol, the federal government told the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • March 01, 2024

    Gilstrap Orders Damages Retrial To Avoid $67.5M 'Train Wreck'

    Chief U.S. District Judge Rodney Gilstrap ordered a damages retrial in infringement litigation between G+ Communications and Samsung on Friday, warning there would otherwise be a "guaranteed 'train wreck'" since both parties failed to explain what they believed the $67.5 million verdict means.

  • March 01, 2024

    J&J's Talc Lit The Spark For Doctor's Fatal Cancer, Jury Told

    Johnson & Johnson's baby powder was the 'spark' that caused the cancer that killed a Miami anesthesiologist, an attorney for her widower told jurors Friday as he urged them to punish the company for hiding the product's cancer links from consumers.

  • March 01, 2024

    Justices' Trump Immunity Ruling Could Delay Trial Indefinitely

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to review former President Donald Trump's claim that he's immune from prosecution for allegedly interfering in the 2020 presidential election could indefinitely delay a trial in the case, attorneys say, by raising additional questions that the courts must answer first.

  • March 01, 2024

    Applebee's Atty's 'Mega-Blunder' Warrants Retrial, Court Says

    A Florida appellate panel said Friday that counsel for an Applebee's restaurant made an improper closing statement characterized by one panelist as a "mega-blunder," warranting a retrial of an injury suit accusing the restaurant of causing a customer's slip-and-fall injuries.

  • March 01, 2024

    GSK, Shook Hardy Can Recover Costs After Zofran MDL Win

    GlaxoSmithKline and its attorneys from Shook Hardy & Bacon LLP can recover more than $450,000 in legal costs after beating a multidistrict suit claiming the company's anti-nausea drug Zofran caused birth defects, a federal judge has ruled.

  • March 01, 2024

    Tort Report: $42M Med Mal Award; Hot Coffee Suit In The Air

    A suit over hot coffee spilled at 40,000 feet and the affirmation of a $42 million medical malpractice verdict in Illinois lead Law360's Tort Report, which compiles recent personal injury and medical malpractice news that may have flown under the radar.

  • March 01, 2024

    Judge Doubts Drowsy Juror, Mask Rules Warrant New VC Trial

    A California federal judge expressed doubts Friday over claims that self-described "millennial" venture capitalist Michael Rothenberg deserves a new trial because of a drowsy juror and the court's COVID-19 mask rules, saying he disagrees that the juror was asleep and "welcomes" the Ninth Circuit's guidance on courtroom-masking requirements.

  • March 01, 2024

    Judge Pauses Sale Of Miami Official's Home In $63.5M Case

    A Florida magistrate judge on Friday paused the sale of a Miami city commissioner's house and ordered briefing on whether his homestead exemption claim — which would shield the property from being used to satisfy a $63.5 million judgment — is legitimate.

  • March 01, 2024

    A 'Loud Bang,' Then Chaos: 'Rust' Director Recalls Fatal Shot

    The director of "Rust" took the stand Friday during the involuntary manslaughter trial of film armorer Hannah Gutierrez-Reed, describing a chaotic scene inside a New Mexico church in the moments before and after the on-set shooting death of the film's cinematographer.

  • March 01, 2024

    Pool Co. Hit With $15M Verdict On Rival's False Ad Claims

    A swimming pool equipment manufacturer is on the hook for nearly $15 million after a North Carolina federal jury found it liable on Friday for false advertising and unfair business practices, but it otherwise escaped infringement claims stemming from the use of its rival's trademarks on Amazon product listings.

  • March 01, 2024

    Del. Jury Deadlocks In Roundup User's Cancer Death Trial

    A Delaware state jury deadlocked Friday after an 18-day trial on a South Carolina woman's suit blaming Monsanto Corp.'s Roundup herbicide for causing her husband's fatal cancer and seeking millions in damages.

  • March 01, 2024

    Ga. Judge Will Rule Within 2 Weeks On Bid To DQ Fulton DA

    The Fulton County, Georgia, judge overseeing the election interference case against former President Donald Trump said Friday that, after days of salacious testimony about District Attorney Fani T. Willis' alleged improper relationship, he wants to hear legal arguments about whether the prosecutor should be disqualified.

  • March 01, 2024

    Fired Boston Top Cop Says 'Destroyed Reputation' Merits Trial

    A Boston police commissioner fired after decades-old allegations of domestic abuse surfaced told a federal judge he is entitled to his day in court for his defamation suit, saying the city's former mayor "destroyed" his reputation in the press.

  • March 01, 2024

    IT Firm Workers' $70M Race Bias Verdict Scrapped

    A Texas federal court on Friday wiped away a $70 million jury verdict that 10 former information technology company workers won in a race discrimination suit, saying the evidence didn't back up the hefty damages award.

Expert Analysis

  • Complying With Enforcers' Ephemeral Messaging Guidance

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    Given federal antitrust enforcers’ recently issued guidance on ephemeral messaging applications, organizations must take a proactive approach to preserving short-lived communications — or risk criminal obstruction charges and civil discovery sanctions, say attorneys at Manatt.

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

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    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • How Echoing Techniques Can Derail Witnesses At Deposition

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    Before depositions, defense attorneys must prepare witnesses to recognize covert echoing techniques that may be used by opposing counsel to lower their defenses and elicit sensitive information — potentially leading to nuclear settlements and verdicts, say Bill Kanasky and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Opinion

    Compassionate Release Grants Needed Now More Than Ever

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    After the U.S. Sentencing Commission's recent expansion of the criteria for determining compassionate release eligibility, courts should grant such motions more frequently in light of the inherently dangerous conditions presented by increasingly understaffed and overpopulated federal prisons, say Alan Ellis and Mark Allenbaugh at the Law Offices of Alan Ellis.

  • Mitigating Whistleblower Risks After High Court UBS Ruling

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    While it is always good practice for companies to periodically review whistleblower trainings, policies and procedures, the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent whistleblower-friendly ruling in Murray v. UBS Securities helps demonstrate their importance in reducing litigation risk, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Justices' Double Jeopardy Ruling Preserves Acquittal Sanctity

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s unanimous decision last week in McElrath v. Georgia, barring the state from retrying a man acquitted of murder after a so-called repugnant verdict, is significant in the tangled web of double jeopardy jurisprudence for its brief and unequivocal protection of an acquittal’s finality, says Lissa Griffin at Pace Law School.

  • High Court Forfeiture Case Again Pits Text Against Purpose

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    In oral arguments Tuesday in McIntosh v. U.S., the U.S. Supreme Court will consider whether a federal court can impose asset forfeiture on a defendant even if it doesn’t comply with timing rules, which may affect the broader interpretation of procedural deadlines — and tees up the latest battle between textualism and purposivism, say Anden Chow and Christian Bale at MoloLamken.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • More Than Drugs At Stake In High Court's 'Blind Mule' Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's eventual decision in Diaz v. U.S., evaluating whether expert witnesses may testify that most defendants caught with drugs at the border know they are transporting drugs, could have implications for prosecuting everything from complex financial crimes to gun and drug cases, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Why Fla. High Court Adopting Apex Doctrine Is Monumental

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    The Florida Supreme Court recently solidified the apex doctrine in the Sunshine State, an important development that extends the scope of the doctrine in the state to include both corporate and government officials, and formalizes the requirements for a high-level corporate official to challenge a request for a deposition, says Laura Renstrom at Holland & Knight.

  • A Refresher On Witness Testimony In 3 Key Settings

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    The recent controversy over congressional testimony from university presidents about antisemitism on campus serves as a reminder to attorneys about what to emphasize and avoid when preparing witnesses to testify before Congress, and how this venue differs from grand jury and trial proceedings, say Jack Sharman and Tyler Yarbrough at Lightfoot Franklin.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

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    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

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