Ohio

  • March 21, 2024

    Ohio Biz Can't Revive Tariff On Brazilian Cold-Rolled Steel

    An Ohio-based steel company wasn't able to unravel a U.S. International Trade Commission decision that freed Brazilian cold-rolled steel from tariffs, after the U.S. Court of International Trade ruled the commission hadn't erred while evaluating the effect of the imports on the domestic industry.

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Doubtful Of Hospital Workers' Vax Exemption Claim

    A Sixth Circuit panel appeared skeptical Thursday of an argument from a class of former employees of Ohio Children's Hospital that their First Amendment rights to freedom of religion were violated under the hospital's COVID-19 employee vaccination policy.

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Zeroes In On CBA In Vax Bias Preemption Battle

    A Sixth Circuit panel pressed on Thursday a cargo airline and pilots who say they were unlawfully fired for refusing COVID-19 vaccinations about the pilots' union contract, with one judge asking whether the open questions about their collective bargaining agreement meant the discrimination case was preempted.

  • March 21, 2024

    Feds, Green Groups Say Campbell's Is Polluting Lake Erie

    The United States and two environmental groups brought separate complaints on the same day accusing a Campbell's subsidiary of violating the Clean Water Act by polluting Lake Erie and the Maumee River with wastewater from its northwestern Ohio canning facility.

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Unsure Of OSU, Prof's Harassment Wins

    A Sixth Circuit judge asked an Ohio State University attorney Thursday "why in the world" a jury wasn't allowed to decide parts of a former graduate student's sexual harassment and retaliation claims against the university and a professor.

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Judge Doubts Challenge To $39B Student Debt Relief

    A Sixth Circuit judge was skeptical Thursday that two libertarian think tanks had shown the Biden administration's plan to wipe out billions of dollars in student loan debt puts them at a disadvantage to recruit indebted lawyers, saying the groups didn't fully explain who they were competing against.

  • March 21, 2024

    Ky. Coal Mine Owner Tells 6th Circ. Lease Sale Was Improper

    The owner of a sprawling Kentucky coal mine told the Sixth Circuit on Thursday that a sale of leases by the mine's bankrupt operator was improper because the bankruptcy court didn't hold a required hearing on changes to the assignment of leases.

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Revives 2 Workers' Claims In Religious Vax Bias Suit

    The Sixth Circuit revived a case alleging an Ohio hospital discriminated against workers by requiring the COVID-19 vaccine despite their religious objections, but only for two of the 46 workers behind the suit, finding they were the only ones who showed they may have been harmed.

  • March 20, 2024

    Biden Taps Judicial Nominees For 6th Circuit, SDNY

    President Joe Biden on Wednesday unveiled a new slate of judicial nominations, including a current U.S. attorney tapped for a Sixth Circuit seat and another federal prosecutor up for a judgeship in the Southern District of New York.

  • March 20, 2024

    Ohio University Can't Shut Down Ex-Prof's Retaliation Claim

    An Ohio federal judge has rejected a university's attempt to sink a retaliation case brought by a tenured professor who was terminated following a student's sexual harassment complaint, saying his claim that discrimination ultimately led to his ouster is strong enough to stay in court.

  • March 20, 2024

    Republican Bill Targets Colleges Hiring Unauthorized Workers

    Sen. J.D. Vance, R-Ohio, and Rep. Jim Banks, R-Ind., have introduced legislation to prevent universities that receive federal funding from hiring unauthorized immigrants.

  • March 20, 2024

    Stroller Co., Music Publisher Agree To End IP Row Over Song

    Music distributor Third Side Music Inc. and car-seat maker Evenflo Co. Inc. have agreed to end a lawsuit that claimed Evenflo used a "sound-alike" song in its advertisements that allegedly infringed Third Side's rights to music by the electronic band Sofi Tukker, according to a filing in Ohio federal court.

  • March 20, 2024

    How The Supreme Court Could Narrow Chevron

    After hours of oral argument in a closely watched administrative law case, it appeared that some U.S. Supreme Court justices could be open to limiting the opportunities for lower courts to defer to federal agencies' legal interpretations in disputes over rulemaking — and legal experts said there are a number of ways they could do it.

  • March 20, 2024

    Breaking Down Each State's Climate Priority Policies

    Forty-five states have now completed climate action plans outlining how they'll advance federal climate goals through policy and programs in coming years, with most focusing at least in part on real estate development as a way to reduce emissions.

  • March 20, 2024

    Law360 Announces The Members Of Its 2024 Editorial Boards

    Law360 is pleased to announce the formation of its 2024 Editorial Advisory Boards.

  • March 20, 2024

    US Chamber's Litigation Funding Concerns Spur 2 State Laws

    Amid concerns from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce about third-party litigation funding, including from potentially hostile foreign entities, state legislatures in Indiana and West Virginia have recently passed bills imposing restrictions on the practice.

  • March 19, 2024

    Joann Fabric Can Tap $95M Of DIP As It Eyes Quick Ch. 11

    Joann Inc., the retailer known as Joann Fabric and Crafts, received a Delaware bankruptcy judge's approval Tuesday on a bundle of first-day motions, ahead of an impending bid for confirmation of its prepackaged Chapter 11 plan to slash over half a billion dollars of debt and let creditors take over the reorganized business.

  • March 19, 2024

    Potential Bias Taints Mich. Courts, Residents Tell 6th Circ.

    Three Michigan residents urged the Sixth Circuit on Monday to revive their lawsuit alleging unconstitutional bias in Michigan's court system, saying judges sitting on the state's claims court and its appellate court may be unwilling to overrule their colleagues.

  • March 19, 2024

    Bettors' Appeal Over Doped Derby Horse Heard By 6th Circ.

    Bettors on the 2021 Kentucky Derby who did not bet on winner Medina Spirit can't claim negligence or damages in court, even though the horse was later disqualified for failing a drug test, an attorney for Churchill Downs told a Sixth Circuit panel on Tuesday.

  • March 19, 2024

    Trump Asks Supreme Court For Absolute Criminal Immunity

    Former President Donald Trump implored the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday to find that former presidents are absolutely immune from criminal charges related to official acts, warning the court that its adoption of a fact-specific test could appear as a "gerrymandered ruling tailored to deprive" him alone of immunity.

  • March 19, 2024

    Kellogg Arbitration Pact Is Invalid, 6th Circ. Told In 401(k) Fight

    A former Kellogg Co. employee urged the Sixth Circuit to reinstate his lawsuit accusing the company of up-charging retirement plan participants with excessive fees, saying the case was wrongly booted to arbitration without his consent.

  • March 19, 2024

    Leech Tishman Tells 6th Circ. Time Ran Out On Fraud Suit

    A former Leech Tishman attorney was not party to a tolling agreement between his law firm and investors caught in a Ponzi scheme he allegedly should have warned them away from, so the firm should escape vicarious liability once the time limit expired for the investors to sue him, counsel for the firm told the Sixth Circuit Tuesday.

  • March 19, 2024

    Insurer Meets 6th Circ. Resistance In Bid To Undo Amway Win

    Sixth Circuit judges appeared skeptical Tuesday of an AIG unit's argument that it shouldn't have to defend and indemnify Amway Corp. in copyright litigation, with one judge saying he doubted Amway's self-insured policies should take priority over an AIG internet policy.

  • March 19, 2024

    States Converge On Texas' Challenge To EPA Methane Rule

    A California-led coalition of Democratic attorneys general wants to defend new federal limits on oil and gas industry methane emissions challenged by Texas, Oklahoma and other conservative states, with supporters of the new rules claiming a sovereign interest in protecting their citizens from harmful greenhouse gas pollution.

  • March 19, 2024

    Nippon Steel Tries To Ease Worries Over $14.9B US Steel Deal

    Nippon Steel Corp. pledged to move its North American headquarters to Pennsylvania in an attempt to assure the public that its proposed $14.9 billion acquisition of Pittsburgh-based U.S. Steel will ultimately be good for the domestic steel industry.

Expert Analysis

  • Issues High Court Is Weighing In Gov't Social Media Cases

    Author Photo

    Two U.S. Supreme Court cases aim to resolve a circuit split on whether public officials who block commenters from their personally created accounts are acting "under color of" state law, and the justices are grappling with determining how canonical legal principles will fit into a shifting landscape driven by advances in technology, says Alyssa Howard at Zuckerman Spaeder.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

    Author Photo

    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • The Key To Defending Multistate Collective FLSA Claims

    Author Photo

    Federal circuit courts are split on the reach of a court's jurisdiction over out-of-state employers in Fair Labor Standards Act collective actions, but until the U.S. Supreme Court agrees to review the question, multistate employers should be aware of a potential case-changing defense, say Matthew Disbrow and Michael Dauphinais at Honigman.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

    Author Photo

    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

    Author Photo

    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

    Author Photo

    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • An Overview Of Circuit Courts' Interlocutory Motion Standards

    Author Photo

    The Federal Arbitration Act allows litigants to file an immediate appeal from an order declining to enforce an arbitration agreement, but the circuit courts differ on the specific requirements for the underlying order as well as which motion must be filed, as demonstrated in several 2023 decisions, says Kristen Mueller at Mueller Law.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

    Author Photo

    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Ohio Voters Legalize Cannabis — What Comes Next?

    Author Photo

    This month, voters approved a citizen-initiated statute that legalizes marijuana for recreational use in Ohio, but the legalization timeline could undergo significant changes at the behest of the state's lawmakers, say Daniel Shortt and David Waxman at McGlinchey Stafford.

  • Seized Art Ownership Row Highlights Importance Of Vetting

    Author Photo

    The Cleveland Museum of Art's recent suit against the Manhattan District Attorney's Office to block a seizure order and contest its rightful ownership of a headless statue worth $20 million presents an uncommon challenge that underscores the criticality of due diligence prior to acquiring artworks, especially older pieces, say Robert Darwell and Zach Dai at Sheppard Mullin.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Ohio archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!