Ohio

  • April 04, 2024

    Fifth Third Hit With Fee Suit Over Bounced Check Deposits

    Cincinnati-based Fifth Third Bank NA got hit with a proposed class action alleging it charges consumers unlawful fees when they try to deposit a check that bounces, with three customers arguing they got unfairly punished for someone else giving them a bad check without their knowledge.

  • April 04, 2024

    Wash. AG Defends Authority To Block Kroger-Albertsons Deal

    The Washington Attorney General's Office has told a state court that a local consumer protection law allows it to bring actions challenging anti-competitive mergers and urged the court to reject contentions from Kroger and Albertsons that the state lacks authority to block a nationwide deal.

  • April 04, 2024

    MV Realty Abusing Ch. 11 Process, Bankruptcy Court Told

    State prosecutors, federal agencies and consumer advocates have told a Florida bankruptcy judge that MV Realty is using the Chapter 11 process to avoid enforcement and enshrine a set of predatory agreements designed to extract millions in junk fees from homeowners over the next 40 years.

  • April 03, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Revive RV Driver's Ford Chassis Warranty Suit

    A Sixth Circuit panel has found that a lower court was correct to rule in favor of Ford Motor Co. in a potential class action claiming it is responsible for fixing alignment issues in recreational vehicles built with the car company's chassis.

  • April 03, 2024

    Hospital Workers' Vax Free Speech Suit Falls Flat At 6th Circ.

    The Sixth Circuit backed the dismissal of two workers' claims that a children's hospital violated their constitutional rights when it rejected their religious objections to a COVID-19 vaccine mandate, saying Wednesday they failed to show the hospital was a government actor.

  • April 03, 2024

    Amazon Book Scammer Can't Trim Prison Time

    The Sixth Circuit affirmed a 16-year prison sentence Tuesday for a man who scammed Amazon by renting textbooks from the e-commerce giant and then selling them at a profit, ultimately costing Amazon approximately $3.2 million.

  • April 03, 2024

    5 Hotel Cos. Defeat Trafficking Claims, 2 Others Settle

    An Ohio federal judge gave five hospitality companies early wins against a sex trafficking survivor's liability claims and dismissed two others following undisclosed settlement agreements, bringing an end to the survivor's suit alleging the companies should have seen warning signs and prevented what happened to her.

  • April 02, 2024

    Transportation Department Finalizes New Train Crew Size Rule

    The U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Railroad Administration on Tuesday finalized a rule requiring freight trains to be operated with at least two people, forging ahead with a mandate long supported by rail workers' unions and safety advocates, but one that major rail carriers have decried as unnecessary and costly.

  • April 02, 2024

    Ohio Regulator Urges Justices To Review FERC Deadlock Rule

    The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to review the Third Circuit's decision upholding a rule change from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission that took effect despite a commissioner deadlock, arguing that the appellate court didn't apply a fitting standard.

  • April 02, 2024

    Another Judge Says Feds Overstepped With GHG Rule

    A Kentucky federal judge has sided with Kentucky and 20 other Republican-led states, ruling that the Federal Highway Administration overstepped its authority with a rule directing states to set targets for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from federally funded highway projects.

  • April 01, 2024

    6th Circ. Judge Warns Of 'Trap' In Medical Malpractice Laws

    The Sixth Circuit has backed an Ohio federal judge's decision to toss a couple's claim against a doctor they say failed to provide proper prenatal care that could have prevented their child's brain damage, with one judge writing separately that the relevant laws can easily "trap unwary litigants" with their requirements.

  • April 01, 2024

    FDIC Dings 2 More Banks Over 3rd-Party Relationships

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. has ordered an Ohio community bank and a New York digital "hybrid" bank to strengthen their oversight of business partners, the latest in the agency's recent spate of enforcement actions over banks' management of their third-party relationships with financial technology firms and other outside companies.

  • April 01, 2024

    Lack Of Full Transcript Dooms Med Mal Verdict Appeal

    An Ohio state appeals panel has affirmed a verdict clearing a doctors' group from a woman's malpractice suit, saying without a full transcript of the trial, it can't conclude that the court was wrong to block her from presenting certain pieces of evidence.

  • April 01, 2024

    Ex-Teacher, District Seek Wins In Pronoun Policy Bias Suit

    A former teacher and the Ohio school district she accused of forcing her to resign after she refused to use the preferred names and pronouns of her transgender students each filed briefs urging a Buckeye State federal judge to grant them early wins.

  • March 29, 2024

    Ohio Abortion Providers File Suit Over 24-Hour Wait Period

    A group of Ohio organizations filed a lawsuit Friday on behalf of abortion providers in the state, arguing certain longstanding abortion regulations violate amendments made to the state's constitution in November that protect access to abortion care.

  • March 29, 2024

    Ohio School Beats Race Bias Suit Over Pandemic Layoffs

    The University of Akron defeated a lawsuit alleging it targeted two finance professors for layoffs during the pandemic because one is Black and one is Asian, with an Ohio federal judge ruling Friday that the academics relied on faulty statistical analysis to back up their claims.

  • March 29, 2024

    Liberty Units Lose $13.3M Motel Murder Coverage Bid

    CNA and Chubb units have no duty to reimburse two Liberty Mutual units for a $13.3 million judgment stemming from a motel murder, an Ohio federal court ruled, saying no bad faith claim was asserted against the Liberty Mutual units triggering their errors and omissions policies.

  • March 29, 2024

    Sweeping Class Certified In Nationwide Pension Plan Suit

    More than 50,000 participants in a Nationwide pension plan can proceed as a class with claims that the company unlawfully transferred assets from the plan to a company subsidiary, as an Ohio federal judge ruled that questions about Nationwide's conduct outweigh differences among participants.

  • March 29, 2024

    US Steel-Nippon Merger Gets Thumbs Up From ISS, Glass Lewis

    U.S. Steel said Friday that proxy advisory firms Glass Lewis & Co. and Institutional Shareholder Services have recommended that U.S. Steel shareholders vote in favor of its planned $14.9 billion sale to Nippon Steel Corp.

  • March 29, 2024

    8 States Seek $122M After Robocaller Allegedly Ignored Ban

    Attorneys general from eight states urged a federal judge to modify an existing injunction barring a businessman from engaging in robocalling or telemarketing campaigns, asserting he has violated that order, should be held in contempt and must pay $122 million.

  • March 29, 2024

    Off The Bench: Ohtani Woes, Va. Ends Arena Plan, Pac-12 Deal

    In this week’s Off The Bench, MLB superstar Shohei Ohtani tries to untangle himself from a gambling scandal, Virginia’s rejection sends two D.C. pro franchises back home, and the Pac-12 pays up to two schools that were left behind. If you were sidelined this week, Law360 will catch you up with the sports and betting stories that had our readers talking.

  • March 28, 2024

    Red Roof Inns Must Face Ohio Sex Trafficking Suits

    Red Roof Inns Inc. can't escape nine lawsuits over its purported role in sex trafficking, an Ohio federal judge ruled Thursday, saying the anonymous victims met pleading standards to allege the hotel chain knowingly made money through their victimization.

  • March 28, 2024

    Fitness Firm Wants TTAB To Ax Mountain Bike Co.'s TMs

    Workout products company Rogue Fitness has urged an Ohio federal judge to make the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office cancel a mountain bike seller's registration for its "Rogue Ridge" mark, arguing the USPTO's internal appeals board wrongly refused to do so when the fitness company objected.

  • March 28, 2024

    Former Prison Contractor Must Pay $112K, 6th Circ. Says

    The Sixth Circuit on Thursday affirmed a National Labor Relations Board decision ordering a former Federal Bureau of Prisons contractor and a Michigan halfway house to pay around $112,000 to two fired workers, supporting the agency's conclusion that the entities are liable for back pay.

  • March 28, 2024

    Ohio Justices Split On Attorney's Sanction For Hiding His Past

    The Ohio Supreme Court has given a Cleveland attorney a six-month stayed suspension for omitting information in his application for a physician assistant license about multiple name changes and prior proceedings against him for having child pornography on his computer, which he had created via photo editing to demonstrate a point while serving as a defense expert.

Expert Analysis

  • What To Watch As Justices Take Up Title VII Job Transfer Case

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    With its recent decision to hear Muldrow v. City of St. Louis, the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to decide whether an involuntary job transfer can count as employment discrimination under Title VII — an eventual ruling that has potential to reshape workplace bias claims nationwide, says Adam Grogan at Bell Law Group.

  • Opinion

    3 Principles Should Guide MTC's Digital Products Tax Work

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    As the Multistate Tax Commission's project to harmonize sales tax on digital products moves forward, three key principles will help the commission's work group arrive at unambiguous definitions and help states avoid unintended costs, say Charles Kearns and Jeffrey Friedman at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

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    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

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    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

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    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funding Disclosure Should Be Mandatory

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    Despite the Appellate Rules Committee's recent deferral of the issue of requiring third-party litigation funding disclosure, such a mandate is necessary to ensure the even-handed administration of justice across all cases, says David Levitt at Hinshaw.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • Immigration Program Pitfalls Exacerbate Physician Shortages

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    Eliminating shortcomings from U.S. immigration regulations and policies could help mitigate the national shortage of physicians by encouraging foreign physicians to work in medically underserved areas, but progress has been halted by partisan gridlock, say Alison Hitz and Dana Schwarz at Clark Hill.

  • Perspectives

    Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

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    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

  • FLSA Collective Actions: Are Courts Still Dancing The 2-Step?

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    In the absence of amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act, courts have filled in some of the statute's gaps and established a two-step framework for conditional certification of a class, but recent rulings show signs that courts are ready to hold party plaintiffs to a higher standard if they want to recruit others to join their lawsuits, says Allison Powers at Barack Ferrazzano.

  • Courts Can Overturn Deficient State Regulations, Too

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    While suits challenging federal regulations have become commonplace, such cases against state agencies are virtually nonexistent, but many states have provisions that allow litigants to bring suit for regulations with inadequate cost-benefit analyses, says Reeve Bull at the Virginia Office of Regulatory Management.

  • Tales From The Trenches Of Remote Depositions

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    As practitioners continue to conduct depositions remotely in the post-pandemic world, these virtual environments are rife with opportunities for improper behavior such as witness coaching, scripted testimony and a general lack of civility — but there are methods to prevent and combat these behaviors, say Jennifer Gibbs and Bennett Moss at Zelle.

  • The Legal Issues Flying Around The Evolving Drone Market

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    As the number of drone registrations is expected to more than double over the next three years, the industry faces new risks and considerations related to privacy, Fourth Amendment, criminal, evidentiary, First Amendment, and insurance litigation, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Employer Drug-Testing Policies Must Evolve With State Law

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    As multistate employers face ongoing challenges in drafting consistent marijuana testing policies due to the evolving patchwork of state laws, they should note some emerging patterns among local and state statutes to ensure compliance in different jurisdictions, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Challenging Standing In Antitrust Class Actions: Timing

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    The early resolution of Article III standing disputes in antitrust class actions can result in sizable efficiencies, but some litigants and courts are improperly relying on the Amchem and Ortiz U.S. Supreme Court cases to defer standing issues until after ruling on plaintiffs' class certification motions, say Michael Hamburger and Holly Tao at White & Case.

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