Massachusetts

  • March 14, 2024

    NLRB Certifies Dartmouth Men's Basketball Player Union

    Dartmouth College must bargain with its men's basketball team after the National Labor Relations Board certified the players' recent landmark vote to unionize with the Service Employees International Union on Thursday, but a legal challenge looms.

  • March 14, 2024

    Most States Fall Short In Disclosing Justices' Finance Reports

    The vast majority of state supreme courts make it exceedingly difficult for the public to get information about justices' financial entanglements, and the information they do give out is often scant at best, according to a report released Thursday.

  • March 14, 2024

    Ex-Mass. Pol Says Federalism Bars COVID Fraud Cases

    A former Massachusetts state senator charged with collecting CARES Act-funded unemployment benefits while being paid for consulting work said in a motion filed Thursday that the 10th Amendment prohibits the federal government from prosecuting him for actions that occurred at the state level.

  • March 14, 2024

    Feds Seek 20 Mos. For Aegerion Fraud 'Puppet Master'

    A pharmaceutical sales representative who gloated about being a "puppet master" for false insurance claims for Aegerion's cholesterol drug should serve 20 months in prison, the U.S. government has told a Boston federal judge.

  • March 13, 2024

    Mass. Gov. Announces Pardon Plan For Marijuana Possession

    Massachusetts Gov. Maura T. Healey has announced plans for sweeping pardons of misdemeanor cannabis possession convictions, following the directive of President Joe Biden, who urged state executives to follow his lead in pardoning low-level marijuana offenses.

  • March 13, 2024

    Ex-NFLer Faced Racism As School Superintendent, Suit Says

    A former NFL player was subjected to racism as the first Black superintendent of schools in Wayland, Massachusetts, and was forced out of his job when he took steps to address it, according to a suit filed Wednesday in state court.

  • March 13, 2024

    IRobot, SharkNinja Settle Last Of Roomba Patent Fight

    IRobot and SharkNinja have reached a settlement in principle to resolve what remains of a long-standing patent dispute related to the Roomba robotic vacuum cleaner.

  • March 13, 2024

    Mass. Justice Presses AG On Fast-Track Bid For Zoning Case

    A Massachusetts high court justice on Wednesday expressed concerns about the state attorney general's aggressive bid to fast-track the enforcement of a divisive housing law to the full court as soon as May.  

  • March 13, 2024

    Patriots Owner Flags $2M Lien On 'Useless' Skydiving Facility

    The real estate business of New England Patriots owner Bob Kraft asked a Massachusetts judge to discharge a $2 million mechanic's lien on a defunct indoor wind tunnel and skydiving attraction at a shopping center next to the football team's stadium.

  • March 12, 2024

    Walgreens, Kenvue Unit Sued Over Benzene In Acne Products

    Walgreens, Kenvue unit Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. and Genomma Lab face a trio of proposed consumer fraud class actions in California federal court by customers who alleged their acne treatment products contain unsafe levels of benzene, but that each of the companies failed to disclose its presence in their labeling.

  • March 12, 2024

    Roberto Clemente's Family Appeals Puerto Rico TM Loss

    The family of the late MLB Hall of Famer Roberto Clemente is asking the First Circuit to revive trademark claims against Puerto Rico for the unauthorized use of the former Pittsburgh Pirates outfielder's image on license plates and vehicle registrations.

  • March 12, 2024

    Harvard Data Fraud Report To Be Released In Libel Case

    A Harvard Business School's internal investigative report concerning data fraud allegations against a suspended professor will be made public in a defamation lawsuit against the school, a federal district judge ordered Tuesday.

  • March 12, 2024

    GE Aerospace Plans $650M Manufacturing Investment

    GE Aerospace said Tuesday it plans to invest $650 million into its manufacturing facilities and supply chain this year to bolster support for its commercial and defense customers.

  • March 12, 2024

    AT&T Offloaded Pensions In Risky Annuity Deal, Suit Says

    AT&T shirked its fiduciary duty and put 96,000 workers' retirement savings in jeopardy by transferring pension obligations to a "risky" annuity provider, according to a proposed class action filed in Massachusetts federal court.

  • March 11, 2024

    Fed. Circ. OKs Boston Drug Developer's Patent Win

    A Boston-area biotech developer that has yet to bring a product to market persuaded the Federal Circuit on Monday to affirm a finding by an administrative patent board last year that stripped a smaller Chinese rival of a patent covering a way of using a type of sulfonic acid to potentially treat Alzheimer's disease.

  • March 11, 2024

    Mexico Says High Court Long Shot Not Worth Halting Gun Suit

    The Mexican government asked a Boston federal judge to keep its lawsuit against gun manufacturers moving along while the companies float what they referred to as "sky is falling" arguments to the U.S. Supreme Court challenging a First Circuit ruling that they are not immune from claims they aid and abet drug cartel violence.

  • March 11, 2024

    Entire Deadspin Staff Cut After Site's Sale To European Firm

    All existing employees of sports blogging site Deadspin have been laid off after finding out Monday that the blog's owner, private equity-backed G/O Media Inc., has agreed to sell the site to European firm Lineup Publishing for an undisclosed price.

  • March 11, 2024

    FTC, 10 States Sue 'Sham' Women's Cancer Fund

    The Federal Trade Commission and 10 state attorneys general have filed a federal complaint against a Pennsylvania-based cancer charity fund, calling the foundation a "sham" that deceived donors out of $18 million over five years.

  • March 11, 2024

    Most Claims Trimmed In Ford Faulty Transmission Suit

    A Massachusetts federal judge has thrown out the bulk of a suit alleging Ford Motor Co. knowingly sold vehicles with a faulty transmission system, while allowing breach of implied warranty, fraudulent concealment and state law claims to proceed.

  • March 11, 2024

    SEC Can't Rely On 'Flawed' Ruling To Avoid Retrial, Atty Says

    A Connecticut lawyer facing retrial in a securities fraud case told the First Circuit that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission can't lean on a summary judgment finding that was also flawed.

  • March 08, 2024

    Dartmouth Hoops Union Could Touch Off Legal Madness

    A recent vote by the Dartmouth College men's basketball team to form a union could set the stage for the next round of litigation in shaping the rights of collegiate athletes, but experts told Law360 some steep obstacles could stand in the way of a breakthrough ruling that turns student athletes into full-fledged employees.

  • March 08, 2024

    Mass. Bar Agency Seeks Name Revision Due To Slavery Link

    The state agency that regulates attorney conduct in Massachusetts is proposing a name change that would replace an archaic word seen by some as tainted by an association with slavery.

  • March 08, 2024

    Mass. Justices OK Town's 'Clever' Gradual Tobacco Ban

    A Massachusetts town's admittedly novel bylaw phasing out the sale of tobacco by prohibiting sales to anyone born in this century could become a model for other local communities after the regulation withstood a legal challenge by a group of retailers at the state's highest court Friday.

  • March 08, 2024

    Debt-Stricken Homeowners Fight Back After High Court Ruling

    Ten months after a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision finding a Minnesota county wrongly held onto excess proceeds it reaped after seizing a woman’s condominium and selling it to settle a tax debt, states are scrambling to reexamine their laws as financially distressed homeowners file new suits challenging the practice.

  • March 08, 2024

    Harvard Prof Fights Release Of School's Data Fraud Report

    A Harvard researcher put on leave for allegedly fabricating research data told a Boston federal judge Friday it would be "poor policy" to let the school make public an internal 1,200-page report to dispute claims in a $25 million defamation suit she filed after her employer's accusations placed her at the center of a "media firestorm."

Expert Analysis

  • Why Standing Analysis Is Key In Data Breach Mediation

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    Amid a growing wave of data breach class action litigation, recent legal developments show shifting criteria for Article III standing based on an increased risk of future identity theft, meaning parties must integrate assessments of standing into mediation discussions to substantiate their settlement demands in data breach class actions, says Abe Melamed at Signature Resolution.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Needs Defense Amid Political Threats

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    Amid recent and historic challenges to the judiciary from political forces, safeguarding judicial independence and maintaining the integrity of the legal system is increasingly urgent, says Robert Peck at the Center for Constitutional Litigation.

  • How Law Firms Can Use Account-Based Marketing Strategies

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    Amid several evolving legal industry trends, account-based marketing can help law firms uncover additional revenue-generating opportunities with existing clients, with key considerations ranging from data analytics to relationship building, say Jennifer Ramsey at stage LLC and consultant Gina Sponzilli.

  • Series

    Mass. Banking Brief: The Notable Compliance Updates In Q3

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    Among the most significant developments in the financial services space in the third quarter of the year, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court handed down a stunning endorsement of the state's fiduciary duty rule, and banking regulators continued their multiyear crackdown on unregistered entities, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • AGs' Distaste For Food Bill May Signal Other State Issues

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    States' recent opposition to a proposed federal law that would block them from regulating out-of-state agricultural production could affect issues beyond this narrow debate, such as the balance of state and federal regulatory power, reproductive rights post-Dobbs, and energy production and water use, say Christopher Allen and Stephen Cobb at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Strategic Succession Planning At Law Firms Is Crucial

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    Senior partners' reluctance to retire, the rise of the nonequity partner tier and generational differences in expectations are all contributing to an increasing number of departures from BigLaw, making it imperative for firms to encourage retirement among senior ranks and provide clearer leadership pathways to junior attorneys, says Laura Leopard at Leopard Solutions.

  • Cos. Must Show Discretion In Public Statements When Sued

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    A recent securities class action ruling in Massachusetts federal court against software company Pegasystems shows that a boilerplate public denial of a lawsuit's merits can form the basis for a claim that the statement was false or misleading, underscoring the need to use discretion when responding to pending claims, say Brian Kearney and Stephen Kastenberg at Ballard Spahr.

  • Autonomous Vehicles Must Navigate Patchwork Of State Regs

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    With only modest action by the federal government on the autonomous vehicle regulatory front in 2023, states and localities remain the predominant source of new regulations affecting AVs — but the result is a mix of rules that both help and hinder AV development and adoption, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • Maximizing Law Firm Profitability In Uncertain Times

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    As threats of an economic downturn loom, firms can boost profits by embracing the power of bottom-line management and creating an ecosystem where strategic financial oversight and robust timekeeping practices meet evolved client relations, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Strategic Consulting.

  • Alleged $636M Deal Error Highlights Ethics Considerations

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    Adelman v. Proskauer, a malpractice suit that allegedly arose from a cut-and-paste error resulting in potential damages of $636 million, presents an intriguing juxtaposition of facts and legal issues — and practical ethical considerations for transactions attorneys, says Richard Leisner at Trenam Law.

  • Federal Policies Keeping Autonomous Vehicles In Slow Lane

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    In the first installment of this two-part article, attorneys at Faegre Drinker examine recent federal regulations and programs related to autonomous vehicles — and how the federal government's failure to implement a more comprehensive AV regulatory scheme may be slowing the progress of the industry.

  • Mass. Ruling Shows Value Of Additional Insured Specifics

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    A Massachusetts court’s recent D.F. Pray v. Wesco Insurance decision demonstrates that blanket additional insured endorsements can create issues with personal jurisdiction, so those named as additional insureds should require their lower-tier contractors to use specific endorsements, say Thomas Dunn and Sheya Rivard at Pierce Atwood.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Reminds Attys That CBP Can Search Devices

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent Malik v. Department of Homeland Security decision adds to the chorus of federal courts holding that border agents don’t need a warrant to search travelers’ electronic devices, so attorneys should consider certain special precautions to secure privileged information when reentering the U.S., says Jennifer Freel at Jackson Walker.

  • Alleged $636M Deal Error Shows Value Of Old-School Methods

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    Though Proskauer Rose has now settled claims involving a copy-paste error in deal documents that could have resulted in $636 million in damages, the debacle reminds attorneys that classic revision methods using paper copies can help avoid drafting errors and actually save time in the long run, says Richard Leisner at Trenam.

  • Avoiding The Ethical Pitfalls Of Crowdfunded Legal Fees

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    The crowdfunding of legal fees has become increasingly common, providing a new way for people to afford legal services, but attorneys who accept crowdsourced funds must remember several key ethical obligations to mitigate their risks, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

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