Government Contracts

  • March 04, 2024

    Judge Says ICE Could've Acted On $14M Deal Protest Sooner

    A U.S. Court of Federal Claims judge tossed a lawsuit protesting a $14.5 million U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement body armor deal, but not without chiding the agency for failing to address a purported conflict of interest earlier on in the dispute.

  • March 04, 2024

    What To Know About 9th Circ. Ruling On Tribe's Sacred Site

    A split Ninth Circuit ruling that a sacred tribal site in Arizona's Tonto National Forest can be transferred to a copper mining company is certain to be appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court by the San Carlos Apache Tribe, which contends that the decision effectively bulldozes a long-held worship site and ultimately denies the tribe's freedom of religious expression, despite the panel's skepticism of that claim.

  • March 04, 2024

    Hospital Operator Pushes For Ch. 11 Plan Confirmation

    California-based hospital operator Alecto Healthcare Services LLC defended its Chapter 11 plan proposal Monday in Delaware bankruptcy court, saying opposition from creditors is based on a faulty belief that there are valuable claims that can be asserted for the benefit of creditors.

  • March 04, 2024

    Feds' Lack Of Payments Hampers Services, Tribal Groups Say

    The National Congress of American Indians and tribes are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold lower court rulings ordering the federal government to reimburse the San Carlos Apache and Northern Arapaho tribes for millions of dollars in administrative costs related to their delivery of health programs.

  • March 04, 2024

    Guard Deal Termination Appeal Came Too Late, Fed. Circ. Says

    The Federal Circuit on Monday declined to revive a construction company's untimely challenge over the termination of a $20.5 million National Guard contract, saying the company had enough information to be aware of the deadline to appeal.

  • March 04, 2024

    Pentagon Leaker Faces Lengthy Prison Term After Plea

    Jack Teixeira, the 22-year-old Massachusetts Air National Guardsman charged with one of the most significant military intelligence leaks in U.S. history, is facing more than a decade in prison after pleading guilty Monday to multiple violations of the Espionage Act.

  • March 01, 2024

    Wash. Judge Doubts Public Was Shut Out Of Shelter Plan

    A Washington state appellate judge on Friday asked opponents of a plan to turn a hotel near Seattle into a shelter for homeless people why a pair of community meetings weren't enough to meet King County's obligation to listen to public feedback. 

  • March 01, 2024

    Microsoft Escapes SAIC's Night-Vision Goggle Patent Suit

    A U.S. Court of Federal Claims judge has found that Microsoft Corp. didn't infringe a Science Applications International Corp. patent in a suit accusing the federal government of contracting with Microsoft and L3 Technologies Inc. for night-vision goggle weapon systems with infringing displays, but the judge also denied bids to find the patent invalid.

  • March 01, 2024

    Wash. Seeks Injunction To Force GEO ICE Prison Inspections

    The Washington state labor and health departments have urged a Washington federal judge to compel GEO Group to let inspectors inside a Seattle-area immigrant detention facility, saying the private prison giant will otherwise continue to block entry and keep regulators from investigating complaints about unsafe and unsanitary conditions.

  • March 01, 2024

    Joint Venture Wins $45B DOE Nuclear Deal Again After Protest

    The U.S. Department of Energy has again awarded a $45 billion nuclear waste management contract to a BWXT, Fluor and Amentum joint venture, after a previous award to the company was vacated over its failure to follow a federal registration requirement.

  • March 01, 2024

    Construction Co. Loses $492M Corps Deal Protest

    The Court of Federal Claims has shot down a construction company's contention that the Army Corps of Engineers awarded a $492.3 million cutoff wall project deal despite the awardee having a deficient subcontractor commitment letter, saying the letter wasn't needed.

  • March 01, 2024

    Ex-Raytheon Worker Asks Full 5th Circ. To Revive Firing Suit

    An ex-Raytheon engineer pressed the full Fifth Circuit to reconsider a panel decision blocking claims that he was fired for reporting concerns with a naval system, saying the panel wrongly expanded a national security court review bar to government contractors.

  • March 01, 2024

    Gov't Wants Spectrum Fraud Case Against Dish Dismissed

    The Justice Department has decided to intervene in a suit accusing Dish Network of using sham companies to buy spectrum from the Federal Communications Commission at a $3.3 billion discount, but not to take over litigation of the matter — it wants to end the whole thing.

  • March 01, 2024

    Ky. Sees $74M Boost For Abandoned Mine Cleanup Work

    The U.S. Department of the Interior said it is awarding Kentucky another $74 million in funding to help the state address dangerous and polluting abandoned mines.

  • March 01, 2024

    Iranian National Faces 20 Years For Defense Hack Scheme

    An Iranian national faces up to 20 years in prison for his alleged role in a yearslong hacking scheme that targeted U.S. companies, including defense contractors, often by using fake female personas on social media, according to a freshly unsealed indictment.

  • March 01, 2024

    Calif. Water Utility Sues Feds Over Havasu Easement Access

    A California public water utility hit the U.S. Department of the Interior with a complaint accusing the agency of preventing the utility from using an easement to access its supply pipeline located near the Parker Dam on Lake Havasu and distribute water to nearby residents.

  • March 01, 2024

    DC Appeals Court Affirms 2014 Firing Of Administrative Judge

    A Washington, D.C., appeals court upheld the termination of a D.C. Office of Administrative Hearings judge who was fired nearly a decade ago amid scrutiny for a range of ethics violations that included steering a $43,000 city contract to the husband of the agency's general counsel.

  • February 29, 2024

    Pentagon Leak Suspect To Change Plea In Hearing Next Week

    Federal prosecutors indicated Thursday that a former Massachusetts Air National Guardsman will change his not guilty plea to charges he posted hundreds of top-secret military intelligence documents online, asking a Massachusetts federal judge to schedule a change of plea hearing for next week.

  • February 29, 2024

    GSA's Chinese Cameras Better Off In Russia, House Rep. Quips

    Members of the U.S. House of Representatives criticized the federal government's 2022 purchase of 150 Chinese cameras over national security concerns during a Thursday hearing, with one lawmaker calling to get rid of them and send them to Russia instead.

  • February 29, 2024

    Worley Pays Ecuador $6M To Resolve Oil Refinery Dispute

    The Ecuador attorney general's office has reported that Worley International Services Inc. fully paid a $6 million award to reimburse the country for fees and costs it incurred in an international arbitration over bribes the engineering firm made to secure oil refinery contracts.

  • February 29, 2024

    DOJ Says Court Rehab Means Ga. Bid Rig Case Must Move

    Construction at Savannah, Georgia's federal courthouse means three men accused of conspiring to rig bids for millions of dollars' worth of ready-mix concrete contracts will have to be tried in a college town a couple of counties over, according to the DOJ.

  • February 29, 2024

    Lima Denies Contractor's Call For Sanctions In $140M Row

    Lima has asked a D.C. federal judge to deny a highway contractor's bid for attorney fees as it looks to enforce nearly $140 million in arbitral awards against the Peruvian city, saying the contractor wrongly claims that the city's attempts to vacate the awards are sanctionable.

  • February 29, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Won't Revive Flood Suit Over Cherokee Casino

    A Federal Circuit Court of Appeals panel on Thursday denied an Oklahoma landowner's bid to overturn a lower court's ruling that the federal government isn't liable for flooding damage to her property due to activity at a nearby Cherokee Nation casino, saying that the claim requires proof that the matter is a "direct, natural or probable result" of its actions.

  • February 29, 2024

    Boeing To Pay $51M To End 199 Arms Export Violation Claims

    The Boeing Co. will pay $51 million to resolve nearly 200 export violations that threatened U.S. national security when its foreign employees downloaded and transferred technical data in violation of the International Traffic in Arms Regulations, with $24 million to go toward compliance efforts, the U.S. Department of State announced Thursday.

  • February 29, 2024

    Newsom, Tribe Must Negotiate Gambling Pact Under IGRA

    A federal district court judge ruled in favor of a California tribe in its challenge to Gov. Gavin Newsom for failing to negotiate its gambling compact in good faith, saying a Ninth Circuit determination that off-list topics cannot be included in tribal agreements heavily swayed the decision.

Expert Analysis

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

    Author Photo

    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

    Author Photo

    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Unpacking The New Russia Sanctions And Export Controls

    Author Photo

    Although geographically broad new prohibitions the U.S., U.K. and EU issued last week are somewhat underwhelming in their efforts to target third-country facilitators of Russia sanctions evasion, companies with exposure to noncompliant jurisdictions should pay close attention to their potential impacts, say attorneys at Shearman.

  • Args In APA Case Amplify Justices' Focus On Agency Power

    Author Photo

    In arguments last week in Corner Post v. Federal Reserve, the U.S. Supreme Court justices paid particular importance to the possible ripple effects of their decision, which will address when a facial challenge to long-standing federal rules under the Administrative Procedure Act first accrues and could thus unleash a flood of new lawsuits, say attorneys at Snell & Wilmer.

  • Mitigating Whistleblower Risks After High Court UBS Ruling

    Author Photo

    While it is always good practice for companies to periodically review whistleblower trainings, policies and procedures, the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent whistleblower-friendly ruling in Murray v. UBS Securities helps demonstrate their importance in reducing litigation risk, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • A Cautionary Tale On Hospital-Physician Alignment Structures

    Author Photo

    A $345 million settlement between the U.S. Department of Justice and Community Health Network highlights how quickly hospital and physician alignment relationships can violate legal restrictions on such dealings, and the onerous financial penalties that can ensue, say Robert Threlkeld and Elliott Coward at Morris Manning.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: The Terms Matter

    Author Photo

    Stephanie Magnell and Zachary Jacobson at Seyfarth examine recent decisions from the U.S. Civilian Board of Contract Appeals, the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals and the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, which offer reminders about the importance of including contract terms to address the unexpected circumstances that may interfere with performance.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

    Author Photo

    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Opinion

    Biden Admin's March-In Plan Would Hurt Medical Innovation

    Author Photo

    The Biden administration's proposal to reinterpret the Bayh-Dole Act and allow the government to claw back patents when it determines that a commercialized product's price is too high would discourage private investment in important research and development, says Ken Thorpe at the Rollins School of Public Health.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

    Author Photo

    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • How DOD Can Improve Flexibility Under Proposed Cyber Rule

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Defense should carefully address some of the more nuanced aspects of the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification program to avoid unintended consequences, specifically the proposal to severely limit contractor use of plans of actions and milestones, say Joshua Duvall at Maynard Nexsen and Sandeep Kathuria at L3Harris Technologies.

  • Fed. Circ. Ruling Helps Clarify When Gov't Clawback Is Timely

    Author Photo

    The Federal Circuit’s examination of claims accrual in a January decision that allows the Defense Contract Management Agency to pursue overpayment claims under a cost-reimbursement contract serves as a reminder that the government can lose such claims by waiting too long to file, say Evan Sherwood and Peter Hutt at Covington.

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

    Author Photo

    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

    Author Photo

    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!