Environmental

  • March 04, 2024

    What To Know About 9th Circ. Ruling On Tribe's Sacred Site

    A split Ninth Circuit ruling that a sacred tribal site in Arizona's Tonto National Forest can be transferred to a copper mining company is certain to be appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court by the San Carlos Apache Tribe, which contends that the decision effectively bulldozes a long-held worship site and ultimately denies the tribe's freedom of religious expression, despite the panel's skepticism of that claim.

  • March 04, 2024

    FERC Slams Brakes On $1.1B Bridgepoint-ECP Deal

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has blocked U.K. asset manager Bridgepoint Group PLC's proposed £835 million ($1.1 billion) purchase of Energy Capital Partners LP, saying the companies haven't shown the merger wouldn't affect competition in U.S. electricity markets.

  • March 04, 2024

    Maine Slams Trade Secret Claim In Lobstermen's Tracking Suit

    The Maine state government is pushing back against lobstermen who want a federal court to block a state requirement to have tracking devices on their boats, slamming arguments that the monitoring will reveal fishing patterns and locations they consider trade secrets.

  • March 04, 2024

    Electric Co. Must Face Claim It Kept Coal Partner In The Dark

    Consumers Energy Co. still faces potential liability for excluding a minority owner from a decision to shut down its last remaining coal-fired power plant in 2025, a Michigan state judge ruled Friday, while also narrowing the company's dispute ahead of trial.

  • March 01, 2024

    EV Maker Rivian Rips Investors' Class Cert. Bid In Fraud Suit

    Investors alleging Rivian Automotive Inc. underpriced its electric vehicles and misrepresented its profitability ahead of a blockbuster 2021 initial public offering cannot certify their class with zero evidence, weak fraud-on-the-market theories and troubling litigation tactics, Rivian argued in a California federal court filing Thursday.

  • March 01, 2024

    Pepsi, Kraft And GE Can't Block DEI, Enviro Proxy Proposals

    A division of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has rejected bids from PepsiCo Inc., The Kraft Heinz Co. and General Electric Co. to exclude from their upcoming proxy statements proposals from a conservative think tank on diversity and environmental matters.

  • March 01, 2024

    Jury Awards Midwest Energy $57M On Refined Coal Patents

    A Delaware federal jury on Friday awarded Midwest Energy Emissions Corp. more than $57 million after finding that numerous affiliated companies willfully infringed its patents on technology for refining coal to reduce mercury in emissions from power plants.

  • March 01, 2024

    Wash. Tribe Asks Judge To Revisit 'Cultural Resources' Ruling

    A tribe is urging a Washington federal judge to reconsider a ruling that it can't pursue millions of dollars of "tribal service loss" claims stemming from Upper Columbia River pollution, saying its claims were misconstrued as "cultural resource damages" that can't be recovered under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act.

  • March 01, 2024

    DC Circ. Says EPA Went Too Far In Voiding State Air Plans

    The D.C. Circuit on Friday handed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency a mixed bag regarding its authority to veto state air pollution plans, finding some state policies that exempt polluting facilities during startup, shutdown and malfunction phases are acceptable under the Clean Air Act, while others are not.

  • March 01, 2024

    Energy Dept. Halts Crypto Mining Survey To End Industry Suit

    The crypto industry group challenging a U.S. Department of Energy survey on crypto mining has reached an agreement that will see the government offices destroy any data they've already collected and circulate the survey for comment from stakeholders — a step the crypto players say the government improperly bypassed the first time around.

  • March 01, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Stay Oregon Kids' Climate Case, For Now

    The Ninth Circuit has shot down the U.S. Department of Justice's attempt to pause an Oregon federal judge's decision to allow a lawsuit brought by youths alleging the government's energy policies imperil their future by exacerbating climate change. 

  • March 01, 2024

    Joint Venture Wins $45B DOE Nuclear Deal Again After Protest

    The U.S. Department of Energy has again awarded a $45 billion nuclear waste management contract to a BWXT, Fluor and Amentum joint venture, after a previous award to the company was vacated over its failure to follow a federal registration requirement.

  • March 01, 2024

    Ky. Sees $74M Boost For Abandoned Mine Cleanup Work

    The U.S. Department of the Interior said it is awarding Kentucky another $74 million in funding to help the state address dangerous and polluting abandoned mines.

  • March 01, 2024

    Del. Jury Deadlocks In Roundup User's Cancer Death Trial

    A Delaware state jury deadlocked Friday after an 18-day trial on a South Carolina woman's suit blaming Monsanto Corp.'s Roundup herbicide for causing her husband's fatal cancer and seeking millions in damages.

  • March 01, 2024

    Enviro Group Loses Challenge To NJ Wind Farm Plan

    A New Jersey federal judge has tossed a challenge by a Garden State advocacy group and its founder to two offshore wind projects, including Orsted A/S' now-scrapped plan, ruling that the group failed to show how it is actually injured.

  • March 01, 2024

    Kimberly-Clark Hit With Connecticut PFAS Class Action

    Three Connecticut residents have hit Kimberly-Clark Corp. with a proposed class action for allegedly contaminating private wells near its New Milford manufacturing plant with toxic "forever chemicals" emitted from the facility's smokestacks into the air and spread to the surrounding area.

  • March 01, 2024

    Calif. Water Utility Sues Feds Over Havasu Easement Access

    A California public water utility hit the U.S. Department of the Interior with a complaint accusing the agency of preventing the utility from using an easement to access its supply pipeline located near the Parker Dam on Lake Havasu and distribute water to nearby residents.

  • February 29, 2024

    EPA Puts Off Key Component Of Power Plant GHG Rule

    When highly anticipated regulations intended to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from power plants are finalized this spring, existing gas-fired facilities won't be addressed because separate, broader regulations are being crafted just for them, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday.

  • February 29, 2024

    Biden Floats 3 Nominees To Return FERC To Full Strength

    President Joe Biden on Thursday unveiled a trio of nominees to fill vacant commissioner slots at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, including the solicitor general of West Virginia and a former Massachusetts energy official.

  • February 29, 2024

    Judge OKs $6M Settlement In BMW Emissions Suit

    A federal judge in New Jersey has signed off on a $6 million deal between BMW and drivers of two models who claimed the vehicle-maker unfairly beat emissions testing with specific kinds of software.

  • February 29, 2024

    Deals Rumor Mill: Springer Nature, Warner Bros., ExxonMobil

    Springer Nature's IPO could be valued at $9.7 billion, Warner Bros. has pulled back on Paramount negotiations, and ExxonMobil could fetch $1 billion for Argentinean assets. Here, Law360 breaks down the notable deal rumors from the past week.

  • February 29, 2024

    Offshore Well Closings Need More Enforcement, Groups Say

    The federal government needs to create new regulations aimed at ensuring the prompt environmentally responsible decommissioning of offshore oil and gas wells and platforms, green groups said Thursday.

  • February 29, 2024

    Colo. Panel Says Well Owners' Appeal Belongs In Water Court

    Two Colorado well owners can't bring a county district court lawsuit challenging a well permitting decision by the state water engineer because those issues are "water matters" that belong in a special water court, an appellate panel ruled Thursday.

  • February 29, 2024

    NY Tabs Equinor, Orsted Projects For Offshore Wind Deals

    New York officials on Thursday awarded power contracts to offshore wind projects being developed by Equinor and an Orsted-Eversource partnership, the first contracts awarded under a revised bidding process aimed at combating macroeconomic headwinds buffeting U.S. offshore wind development.

  • February 29, 2024

    GE Denies Ties To La. Environmental Contamination Suit

    General Electric has told a Louisiana federal judge it should be freed from a lawsuit seeking to hold it liable for widespread environmental contamination caused by a since-closed pressure valve manufacturing facility in Rapides Parish, saying the property owners behind the suit are relying on a misguided theory of liability.

Expert Analysis

  • Recent Rulings Add Dimension To Justices' Maui Decision

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's 2020 decision in County of Maui v. Hawaii Wildlife Fund established new factual criteria for determining when the Clean Water Act applies to groundwater — and recent decisions from the Ninth and Tenth Circuits have clarified how litigants can make use of the Maui standard, says Steven Hoch at Clark Hill.

  • 10th Circ. Ruling Means More Okla. Oilfield Pollution Litigation

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    By applying Oklahoma's statutory definitions of pollution to a private landowner's claim for negligence for the first time, the Tenth Circuit's recent decision in Lazy S Ranch v. Valero will likely make it harder to obtain summary judgment in oilfield contamination cases, and will lead to more litigation, say attorneys at GableGotwals.

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

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    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • How Echoing Techniques Can Derail Witnesses At Deposition

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    Before depositions, defense attorneys must prepare witnesses to recognize covert echoing techniques that may be used by opposing counsel to lower their defenses and elicit sensitive information — potentially leading to nuclear settlements and verdicts, say Bill Kanasky and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Proposed RCRA Regs For PFAS: What Cos. Must Know

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    Two rules recently proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency would lead to more per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances being regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, and would increase the frequency and scope of corrective action — so affected industries should prepare for more significant cleanup efforts, say attorneys at Alston & Bird.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • Proposed Hydrogen Tax Credit Regs May Be Legally Flawed

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    While the recently proposed regulations for the new clean hydrogen production tax credit have been lauded by some in the environmental community, it is unclear whether they are sufficiently grounded in law, result from valid rulemaking processes, or accord with other administrative law principles, say Hunter Johnston and Steven Dixon at Steptoe.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Args In APA Case Amplify Justices' Focus On Agency Power

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    In arguments last week in Corner Post v. Federal Reserve, the U.S. Supreme Court justices paid particular importance to the possible ripple effects of their decision, which will address when a facial challenge to long-standing federal rules under the Administrative Procedure Act first accrues and could thus unleash a flood of new lawsuits, say attorneys at Snell & Wilmer.

  • What Recent Setbacks In Court Mean For Enviro Justice

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    Two courts in Louisiana last month limited the federal government's ability to require consideration of Civil Rights Act disparate impacts when evaluating state-issued permits — likely providing a framework for opposition to environmental justice initiatives in other states, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • New Hydrogen Regulations Show The Need For IP Protections

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    The introduction of hydrogen regulations, such as the IRS' proposed tax credit for clean hydrogen under the Inflation Reduction Act, are reshaping the competitive landscape, with intellectual property rights an area of increased emphasis, say Evan Glass and James De Vellis at Foley & Lardner.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Gulf Cooperation Council

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    The Gulf Cooperation Council is in the early stages of ESG policy implementation, but recent commitments by both states and corporations — including increases in sustainable finance transactions, environmental commitments, female representation on boards and human rights enforcement — show continuing progress toward broader ESG goals, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Why Biz Groups Disagree On Ending Chevron Deference

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    Two amicus briefs filed in advance of last month's U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments in Loper Bright Enterprises v. Raimondo highlight contrasting views on whether the doctrine of Chevron deference promotes or undermines the stable regulatory environment that businesses require, say Wyatt Kendall and Sydney Brogden at Morris Manning.

  • A Look Ahead For The Electric Vehicle Charging Industry

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    This will likely be an eventful year for the electric vehicle market as government efforts to accelerate their adoption inevitably clash with backlash from supporters of the petroleum industry, say Rue Phillips at SkillFusion and Enid Joffe at Green Paradigm Consulting.

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