Employment UK

  • March 28, 2024

    New Pension General Code Comes Into Force

    A tough new governance regime for pension trustees has been introduced, in what experts say is a significant step in driving up standards for the sector.

  • March 28, 2024

    UK To Nullify NDAs That Stop People Reporting Crimes

    Non-disclosure agreements that prevent victims from reporting potential crimes are to become unenforceable, the government said Thursday as it announced plans to "clarify" the law governing the controversial contracts.

  • March 27, 2024

    Increase Sick Pay And Offer It To All Workers, MPs Say

    Statutory sick pay is falling short of its role as a safety net and should be increased to match minimum maternity pay, MPs said Thursday in a report calling for major reforms to the entitlement.

  • March 27, 2024

    Hospital Unfairly Fired Worker Accused Of Rape

    A hospital in Devon unlawfully sacked a clinical manager while police investigated him over allegations of rape made by a younger colleague, an employment tribunal has found.

  • March 27, 2024

    Sony Faces £750K Equal Pay Claim From Female Accountant

    A former PlayStation accountant is suing Sony Interactive Entertainment Europe Ltd. for around £750,000 ($946,000), claiming that the company paid her half the salary of her male colleague and sacked her for bringing her case to a tribunal.

  • March 27, 2024

    BoE Says Action On LDI Has Boosted Financial Stability

    The U.K.'s financial stability watchdog said Wednesday that measures introduced in the wake of the pension fund crisis 18 months ago have bolstered resilience to further shocks.

  • March 27, 2024

    Ex-Deloitte Lawyer Cleared Of Sexual Misconduct Claims

    A former Deloitte solicitor was cleared by a disciplinary tribunal on Wednesday of charges that he violated professional standards and committed sexual misconduct by allegedly deliberately kissing a junior colleague on the lips at a work event.

  • March 27, 2024

    Shoosmiths, CMS, HSF Guide £510M Pension Deal For Next

    High street clothing retailer Next PLC has offloaded £510 million ($643 million) of its retirement scheme liabilities to Pension Insurance Corp. PLC, in a deal steered by law firms Herbert Smith Freehills LLP, Shoosmiths LLP and CMS Cameron McKenna Nabarro Olswang LLP.

  • March 27, 2024

    Uber Settles Racist AI Accusations With Driver

    An Uber Eats driver has won a payout after alleging that facial recognition features on the app were discriminating against his darker skin tone and preventing him from getting work, according to Britain's equality watchdog.

  • March 26, 2024

    Ex-Travel Exec Partially Wins Appeal Over Sexual Comments

    An appellate judge ruled Monday that an employment tribunal was wrong to draw conclusions about sexual harassment allegations against the former head of PR at a travel and tourism trade body when assessing his claims for unfair dismissal and whistleblowing.

  • March 26, 2024

    Ex-Director Can't Get 'Rare And Unusual' Dismissal Changed

    An IT consulting business was right to fire a director without warning after their professional relationship irretrievably broke down, and made even the right to appeal a "futile" exercise, an appellate panel has ruled.

  • March 26, 2024

    Ex-Museum Curator Ordered To Return Alleged Stolen Items

    A former British Museum curator accused of stealing over 1,800 artifacts to sell on eBay was ordered on Tuesday to hand over the items he still has and provide information about those he has sold.

  • March 26, 2024

    Ex-Dentons Saudi Chief Sues For $2.6M Of Withheld Pay

    Dentons' former Saudi Arabia managing partner is suing the firm for more than $2.6 million in a London court, alleging that it deprived him of pay after dismissing him for no good reason.

  • March 26, 2024

    Gov't Issues Deadlines For Pensions 'Dashboard' Linkage

    Large pension schemes in the U.K. must connect their plans to the government's long-awaited Pensions Dashboard Program by the end of April 2025, according to new guidance.

  • March 26, 2024

    Over Regulation Restricted Defined Benefit Pensions, MPs Say

    The government should change the focus of the U.K.'s pension watchdog, lawmakers said Tuesday, warning that years of excessive caution on regulation has nearly wiped out the country's remaining defined benefit retirement plans.

  • March 25, 2024

    Eastman Group Says Ex-Employee Lifted IP To Start Rival Co.

    A specialty materials maker has told a London court that an ex-employee stole a valuable database in order to quickly set up a rival company selling paint protection film for cars.

  • March 25, 2024

    Businessman Appeals Ruling That He Wrongly Ousted Director

    A businessman on Monday asked a London court for permission to challenge a ruling that he wrongly forced out a fellow company director in breach of their business' articles of association.

  • March 25, 2024

    Union Wins Day-1 Sick Pay For Care Home Workers

    A major U.K. trade union announced Friday it has agreed to a deal with the U.K.'s largest care home provider to guarantee statutory sick pay for 19,000 care workers from the first day of their sick leave.

  • March 25, 2024

    Muslim Doctor Loses Bias Case Over Hospital Uniform Policy

    A Muslim ophthalmologist was not discriminated against when she was berated for not rolling her sleeves up in a restricted surgery area, an employment tribunal has ruled, saying her bosses were just following uniform and infection prevention policies.

  • March 25, 2024

    UK Firms To Get More Influence On Pension Fund Investing

    British companies will probably enjoy greater sway over the investment decisions taken by their pension plans under new rules being considered by The Pensions Regulator, a consultancy said on Monday.

  • March 25, 2024

    Pro Golfer Wins £20K After Club Axed Him Over 'Savile Joke'

    A tribunal has ordered a country club to pay a professional golfer £19,800 ($25,000) after bosses unfairly fired him amid allegations that he compared a co-worker to Jimmy Savile, an infamous sexual predator, and made other sexual comments to colleagues.

  • March 22, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen the BBC and Wall to Wall Media hit with a passing off lawsuit by musician BOSSIIE, Poundland parent company Pepco Group file a commercial fraud claim against several mobile network giants, family law specialists Alexiou Fisher Philipps LLP start proceedings against former oil trader Michael Prest, and a transgender lawyer file a libel claim against a blogger. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • March 22, 2024

    Peer, Biz Beat Harassment Appeal After Evidence Destroyed

    A major U.K. wholesaler and its Conservative Party peer owner have beaten an appeal from an employee who was sexually harassed by the company's head of finance after a tribunal found the employee had deliberately destroyed evidence.

  • March 22, 2024

    UK Gov't Finds £571.6M State Pension Shortfall

    The government has discovered it has underpaid pensioners to the tune of £571.6 million ($721.2 million), but experts say the figure is only a fraction of the expected total shortfall.

  • March 22, 2024

    Sales Manager Unfairly Fired For Brief Dip In Performance

    A pharmaceutical company jumped the gun by unfairly axing a sales manager after his performance briefly dipped in the wake of the pandemic, a tribunal has ruled.

Expert Analysis

  • UK Tribunal Ruling Sheds Light On Workplace Speech Issues

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    The U.K. Employment Appeal Tribunal's recent judgment in Higgs v. Farmor's School — concerning a Christian employee dismissed for allegedly anti-LGBT social media posts — highlights factors that employers should consider in tricky situations involving employees' speech, says Anna Bond at Lewis Silkin.

  • Tackling Global Inflation Is A Challenge For Antitrust Agencies

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    Recent events have put pressure on antitrust agencies to address the global cost-of-living crisis, but the relationship between competition and inflation is complex, and with competition agencies’ reluctance to act as price regulators, enforcement is unlikely to have a meaningful impact, say lawyers at Linklaters.

  • Employment Tribunal Data Offers Workplace Practice Insights

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    A breakdown of the Ministry of Justice's recent Employment Tribunal figures shows shifting trends among employees, and potential challenges and possible improvement areas for employers, and if the data continues to be published, it could play an essential part in clearing the fast-growing backlog of tribunal matters, says Gemma Clark at Wright Hassall.

  • Unpacking The Rwanda Policy Appeal Decision

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    The Court of Appeal recently declared the U.K. government's Rwanda policy unlawful in AAA v. Secretary of State, but given that this was only on the basis that Rwanda is not currently a safe third country, it is possible that the real risk of Article 3 of the European Convention on Human Rights breaches will be obviated, says Alex Papasotiriou at Richmond Chambers.

  • Opinion

    Why Menstrual Leave Policies May Be Counterproductive

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    Efforts to introduce U.K. standards on leave for menstruation, which in practice has been narrowly applied, may be distracting focus from pay gap and family rights laws, and robust sick leave policies that may be more relevant to tackling gender equality in the workplace, say Sean Nesbitt and Sophie Davidson at Taylor Wessing.

  • Opinion

    UK Noncompete Cap Will Not Grow Business As Intended

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    The U.K. government's recent response to its 2020 consultation on restrictive covenants has not given any obvious consideration to the position of employers, as there is no evidence supporting its proposition that limiting noncompetes to three months will assist recruitment and help employees find new jobs at often higher pay, says David Whincup at Squire Patton.

  • Workplace Neurotech Requires A Balance Of Risk And Reward

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    The U.K. Information Commissioner's Office's recently released a report on neurotech, and while such technologies could unlock a stubbornly low productivity stagnation, they pose employer data compliance questions and potential employee discrimination risks, say Ingrid Hesselbo and Ben Milloy at Fladgate.

  • ITV Scandal Offers Important Considerations On HR Policies

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    The recent resignation of former ITV host Phillip Schofield after admitting to an affair with a younger staff member raises questions on employers' duty of care and highlights the need for not only having the right internal policies in place but also understanding and applying them, says Hina Belitz at Excello Law.

  • What The Italian Whistleblowing Decree Means For Employers

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    The new Italian whistleblowing decree, guidelines to which must be adopted by authorities this week, represents a major milestone in protecting employees by broadening employers' obligations, and it is essential that multinational companies with an interest in Italy verify their compliance with the more stringent requirements, say lawyers at Studio Legale Chiomenti.

  • What TPR's Guidance On DEI Means For Pensions Industry

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    The Pension Regulator is one of the first regulators to issue guidance on equality, diversity and inclusion, and employers and trustees should incorporate its advice by developing policies and monitoring progress to ensure that improvements are made regularly, say lawyers at Linklaters.

  • 10 Tips On Drafting A Company Code Of Ethics

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    In light of a recent report that less than 50% of companies on the FTSE 250 and 350 indexes have a code of ethics, it is clear that more organizations should be informed of the reasons for having one, like reducing risk and solidifying commitment to integrity, and how to implement it, says Shiv Haria-Shah at Fieldfisher.

  • Breaking Down Germany's New Whistleblower Protection Act

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    Germany recently passed a whistleblowing law, which will bring new obligations for companies, and businesses with more than 50 employees must now check whether they have adequate reporting lines in place and properly staffed functions to handle whistleblower reports, say Mark Zimmer and Katharina Humphrey at Gibson Dunn.

  • UK Case Shows Risks Of Taking Shortcuts In Fund Payments

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    While the High Court recently reversed a decision in Floreat Investment Management v. Churchill, finding that investors routing funds into their own accounts was not dishonest, the case serves as a cautionary tale on the dangers of directing investment funds other than as contractually provided, say lawyers at Dechert.

  • How The UK Employment Court Backlogs Jeopardize Justice

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    While employment tribunal case delays may not top the agenda of new Secretary of State for Justice Alex Chalk, recent data reveals deep and long-term issues, including a staggering half a million current or former employees waiting for their case to trudge forward in the queue, says Heather Wilmot at ARAG.

  • A First Look At UK's Reform Approach To EU Employment Law

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    The U.K. government's recent proposal on EU employment laws is relatively modest, retaining the post-Brexit law in areas such as recording working hours and holiday pay calculations, and assuaging predictions of a bonfire of EU employment rights, say Sally Hulston and James Davies at Lewis Silkin.

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