Employment UK

  • April 16, 2024

    Ex-Post Office Boss Says Lawyers Ignored Prosecution Risks

    The Post Office's former chief executive said Tuesday that he was "surprised" that in-house lawyers who prosecuted sub-postmasters based on faulty IT data ignored the risk of failing to disclose certain key facts in court.

  • April 16, 2024

    Ex-Airport Train Staffers Get Early Win In Travel Discount Case

    Former employees of London's Heathrow Express airport train won an appeal Tuesday that they were wrongly barred from a cheap travel benefit after they opted for redundancy — but a new tribunal will decide whether their breach of contract claims can continue.

  • April 16, 2024

    Pensions Industry Backlash Grows Over New Reporting Rules

    The U.K.'s pension watchdog is facing mounting pressure from retirement industry trade bodies to back down from its new reporting obligations for schemes.

  • April 16, 2024

    UK Pension Transfer Numbers Continue To Decline

    The number of savers transferring from defined benefit to defined contribution pension schemes dropped by 32% in the financial year that ended in March 2023, according to figures published Tuesday by the Financial Conduct Authority.

  • April 16, 2024

    Insurance Manager Harassed By Bosses Wins £56K

    A tribunal has ordered a British insurance broker to pay a former manager more than £56,000 ($69,800) after ruling that the business pushed her out because bosses no longer valued her after she went off sick with anxiety and depression.

  • April 16, 2024

    UK Pension Withdrawals Hit Record High

    The number of people making lump sum withdrawals from their U.K. pension savings reached a record high during the financial year that ended in March 2023, according to a new report by the country's financial watchdog published Tuesday.

  • April 15, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy Exec Testifies To Handshake Deals, Backdating

    Autonomy's former U.S. head of sales testified for the prosecution Monday in the criminal fraud trial of founder Michael Lynch, saying he boosted sales figures via "quid pro quo" handshake deals with customers, created pretextual emails to cover his tracks and even backdated a deal to meet revenue targets.

  • April 15, 2024

    Rastafarian Ex-Army Band Player Wins Race Bias Case

    A former British Army horn player has won his racial discrimination case against the Ministry of Defence, with a tribunal concluding that officers stereotyped him as an "angry Black man" and dismissed his complaints about racist treatment.

  • April 15, 2024

    No Quid Pro Quo In Thank You Posts, Fired Journalist Says

    A sports journalist fired after publicly thanking a company that was a corporate sponsor of his charity fundraising efforts argued to an employment tribunal Monday that there was "no quid pro quo" that compromised the BBC.

  • April 15, 2024

    Prison Governor Loses Claim He Was Excluded From Union

    A prison governor lost his claim against a trade union that refused to let him join its ranks twice because he had held key positions in another union that competed with it, an employment tribunal has ruled.

  • April 15, 2024

    AML Exec Loses Bid For Interim Pay In Whistleblowing Case

    The co-founder of a London-based payments platform provider has lost his bid to be paid his £190,000 ($237,000) salary while he pursues a whistleblowing and unfair dismissal claim against the company.

  • April 15, 2024

    Trainee Solicitor's Bid To Claim SQE Fees From Ex-Firm Fails

    A trainee solicitor cannot recoup fees for her legal qualification examinations from her former employer, with a tribunal finding that she failed to prove that the law firm had agreed to pay the fees.

  • April 15, 2024

    Pension Protection Fund Has 'Crucial' Future Role, LCP Says

    The Pension Protection Fund could play a crucial role in the "endgame" for defined benefit pension schemes as a state-backed consolidator of smaller retirement plans, a consultancy has said.

  • April 12, 2024

    US-based MSD Broke Ban On Using 'Merck' In UK, Court Finds

    U.S.-based Merck Sharp & Dohme LLC's use of the "Merck" name on websites and social media breached the terms of a court order barring it from using the name in the U.K. to protect German drugmaker Merck KGaA's rights, a London court ruled Friday.

  • April 12, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen footwear brand Dr. Martens hit online retailer Temu with a passing off claim, Welsh soccer club Swansea sue its former head coach Russell Martin, Russian diamond tycoon Dmitry Tsvetkov file a claim against his former business Equix Group Ltd., and U.S. bank Omega Financial Corporation hit African oil and gas company Tende Energy with a claim. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • April 12, 2024

    John Lewis Beats Muslim Worker's Discrimination Claim

    Department store John Lewis has beaten accusations that it discriminated against a Muslim employee, but it botched the process for sacking him, a tribunal has ruled.

  • April 12, 2024

    Abbott Loses Bid To Nix UK Whistleblowing Case On Appeal

    An appeals tribunal has rejected Abbott Laboratories' bid to escape a whistleblowing case brought by the founders of a British DNA technology business that it bought, concluding on Friday that the founders had an arguable case that U.K. judges had jurisdiction.

  • April 12, 2024

    Temp Engineer Must Pay £27K For 'Vexatious' Behavior

    An employment tribunal has ordered a temp to pay thousands of pounds in litigation costs for bringing a claim he knew he would lose, having previously failed to show on three other occasions that he was an employee or a worker.

  • April 12, 2024

    Kingsley Napley Launches 'Enhanced' Carers' Leave

    Kingsley Napley LLP said Friday that it will provide a week's paid leave for employees to care for children, elderly parents or disabled relatives, a move that exceeds its statutory obligations and sets a precedent for other firms in the industry.

  • April 12, 2024

    Sky Managers Can't Appeal Dismissal Case On New Grounds

    Two former Sky store managers cannot reargue their claim that the company owes them money following a mandatory change of role, an appeals tribunal has ruled, blocking them from raising a challenge on grounds that did not come up in the original case.

  • April 12, 2024

    Over 800 Directors Banned For COVID Loan Fraud In 1 Yr

    A total of 831 company directors were banned in the last 12 months for defrauding the COVID loan support scheme for businesses following investigations by the Insolvency Service, the government agency said Friday.

  • April 12, 2024

    Pension Body Warns Of 'Burdensome' New Reporting Rules

    A U.K. pension industry body has called for new reporting regulations on the sector to be toned down, warning that the additional red tape could deter smaller schemes from taking steps to improve their investment strategies.

  • April 11, 2024

    Autonomy Became Less Transparent Before Sale, Jury Told

    An ex-market analyst testifying Thursday in a California criminal trial over claims that former Autonomy CEO Michael Lynch duped HP into buying the British company for $11.7 billion told jurors that the company became less forthcoming about some of its accounting a couple of years before the sale.

  • April 11, 2024

    Law Firm Denies Thwarting Driver's Injury Claim

    JMW Solicitors has pushed back at accusations by an injured delivery driver that it filed his compensation claim against the wrong defendant to avoid a conflict of interest with a valuable client.

  • April 11, 2024

    Airbnb Owner Was Housekeeper's Employer, Tribunal Rules

    A housekeeper who worked at a Scottish castle was an employee instead of a worker and can proceed to sue her old boss for unfairly dismissing her, an employment tribunal has ruled.

Expert Analysis

  • How New UK Subsidy Control Rules Will Differ From EU Law

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    The newly effective Subsidy Control Act contains key differences to the previously applicable EU state aid laws, and legal practitioners should familiarize themselves with the new regime, ensuring that their public sector clients are aware of the challenges it presents, say attorneys at Shepherd and Wedderburn.

  • Preparing For EU's Pay Gap Reporting Directive

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    An agreement has been reached on the European Union Pay Transparency Directive, paving the way for gender pay gap reporting to become compulsory for many employers across Europe, introducing a more proactive approach than the similar U.K. regime and leading the way on new global standards for equal pay, say attorneys at Lewis Silkin.

  • Why Employers Must Address Differences In UK And EU Law

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    Amid globalization and more location-fluid working arrangements, it is crucial that employers recognize and address the differences between U.K. and EU laws in several workforce management areas, including worker representation, pay and benefits, termination of employment, and diversity and inclusion, says Hannah Wilkins at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • How UK Employment Revisions Could Improve On EU Laws

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    There is concern that the U.K. Retained EU Law Bill might remove the numerous protections provided to employees by EU law, but it could bring with it the chance to make better the pieces of law that currently cause employers the biggest headaches, says Simon Fennell at Shoosmiths.

  • Private MP Bills Could Drive Employment Law Reform

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    Instead of a single Employment Bill, the U.K. government is supporting various private proposals by backbench members of Parliament, and cross-party support may mean this process provides a viable route for reforming employment law, says Jonathan Naylor at Shoosmiths.

  • An Irish Perspective On The Women On Boards Directive

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    The EU Women on Boards Directive marks a discernible gear shift in the campaign to achieve gender balance at board level that Irish listed companies must engage with, and those that embark on change now will be well placed to succeed under the new regime, say attorneys at Matheson.

  • UK Ruling Adds Clarity To Duty Of Good Faith In Contracts

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    The recent U.K. Court of Appeal decision in Compound Photonics Group on the implied duty of good faith in commercial contracts ties in with the established requirement to act rationally, although courts are still reluctant to set out a list of minimum standards that will apply in all circumstances, say Louise Freeman and Alan Kenny at Covington.

  • Wearing Religious Signs At Work: The Evolving EU Case Law

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    Based on a recent European Court of Justice ruling, the main criterion for allowing employers to prohibit employees from wearing religious signs on the basis of a policy of neutrality seems to be whether a genuine need exists for doing so, making it harder for employers to apply such a policy, says Chris Van Olmen at Van Olmen & Wynant.

  • What Slovak Labor Code Changes Will Mean For Employers

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    With newly effective amendments to the Slovak Labor Code strengthening employees’ rights in a number of ways, the default mindset of the employee being the weaker party may no longer be the right approach, says Katarina Pfeffer at Bird & Bird.

  • An ICO Reminder On Managing Subject Access Requests

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    Although the U.K. Information Commissioner's Office’s recent seven reprimands regarding mismanagement of data subject access requests are unusual, it is worth organizations considering what resources and training may be available to ensure these are properly managed in the future, says Ross McKenzie at Addleshaw Goddard.

  • Managing The Complexities Of Workers' UK Pregnancy Rights

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    As understanding and complying with maternity rights in the workplace can be tricky, Anna Fletcher and Jane Gowling at Gowling provide an overview of the main risk areas, including redundancy and in vitro fertilization, and highlight recently proposed reforms.

  • 10 Noteworthy Employment Law Developments From 2022

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    Richard Kenyon and Ranjit Dhindsa at Fieldfisher review notable regulations, decisions and legislation in U.K. employment law over the last year, covering flexible work, fire and rehire practices, and diversity and inclusion.

  • Proposed Bill May Change Workplace Sexual Harassment Law

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    The likely implementation of a private members' bill to extend employers' obligations concerning sexual harassment at work means employers should take steps now to ensure they are on the front foot if and when these changes come into force, say Gareth Brahams and Amanda Steadman at BDBF.

  • Key Takeaways From New SRA Sexual Misconduct Guidance

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    It is clear from the Solicitors Regulation Authority’s new sexual misconduct guidance that individuals need to adopt the highest standards of conduct in their professional and personal lives, and firms have a key role in both setting and implementing those standards to create a diverse and inclusive culture, says Andrew Pavlovic at CM Murray.

  • Digital Nomads: Key Considerations For Global Businesses

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    As employers and employees embrace remote, location-independent work arrangements enabled by technology, they must be mindful of the employment law and tax consequences such arrangements may trigger, say Hannah Wilkins and Audrey Elliott at Eversheds Sutherland.

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