Benefits

  • March 04, 2024

    Christian Group Nabs Injunction In EEOC Trans Care Suit

    A North Dakota federal judge said Monday a Christian business group's members no longer have to provide coverage for gender transition care because it violates their religious beliefs, granting the group a key win in its suit challenging the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's governance of federal regulations.

  • March 04, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A Swedish music producer's takeover, a proposed award payable in Tesla shares, Truth Social stock squabbles, and an unusually blunt slap down from the bench added up to an especially colorful week in Delaware's famous court of equity. On top of that came new cases about alleged power struggles, board entrenchment, consumer schemes and merger disputes.

  • March 04, 2024

    Sodexo Nicotine Surcharge Suit Gets Backing From DOL

    The U.S. Department of Labor backed a proposed class action accusing food provider Sodexo of unlawfully charging employees who use nicotine $1,200 more per year for health insurance, telling the Ninth Circuit that the arbitration agreement the company wants to use to sink the case conflicts with federal benefits law.

  • March 04, 2024

    L3Harris Agrees To Pay $650K To Wrap 401(k) Class Action

    Defense contractor L3Harris will pay $650,000 to end a class action accusing it of running afoul of federal benefits law by saddling retirement plan participants with high fees and expensive investment options, according to a Florida federal court filing.

  • March 01, 2024

    McDermott Investors' Cert. Bid Should Be Denied, Judge Says

    Investors in energy industry engineering company McDermott International Inc. shouldn't be granted class certification in their suit over the company's $6 billion all-stock acquisition of Chicago Bridge & Iron Co., a federal magistrate judge has determined.

  • March 01, 2024

    Tesla Stock For Fees? Attys Who Got Musk's Pay Cut Say Yes

    The lawyers who convinced the Delaware Chancery Court to scuttle Elon Musk's proposed $55 billion Tesla compensation package on Friday filed a request for legal fees that came with a twist — they want to be paid in Tesla stock that rounds out to about $5.6 billion.

  • March 01, 2024

    Aetna Can't Escape Fertility Bias Suit From Same-Sex Couple

    A California federal judge has declined to toss a woman's case challenging Aetna's fertility treatment coverage as discriminatory, finding at this stage, she has sufficiently argued that the policy discriminates against LGBTQ couples in violation of the Affordable Care Act.

  • March 01, 2024

    4 Argument Sessions Benefits Attys Should Watch In March

    The Biden administration will urge the Fifth Circuit to preserve preventive services requirements in the Affordable Care Act, the Eighth Circuit will dive into an insurer's payment practices, and the Eleventh Circuit will hear Home Depot workers' bid to revive their 401(k) suit.

  • March 01, 2024

    55K Labcorp 401(k) Participants Seek Class Cert. In NC

    Tens of thousands of participants in a 401(k) plan for Labcorp employees asked a North Carolina federal court on Friday to certify the claims in their benefits lawsuit, arguing they had claims common and typical to warrant certification.

  • March 01, 2024

    Fla. Officials Say Better Process Wouldn't Stop Medicaid Cuts

    Florida health officials have urged a federal judge to toss a proposed class action brought by residents who argued state agencies cut their Medicaid coverage without proper notice, saying whatever notice the agencies might have provided, it wouldn't have made any difference in the residents' eligibility.

  • March 01, 2024

    Printing Co. Strikes Deal To End Ex-Employees' 401(k) Suit

    A Minnesota printing company has agreed to end a proposed class action alleging it unlawfully kept high-priced investment options in its employee 401(k) plan when cheaper alternatives were available, a group of former employees told a federal court.

  • March 01, 2024

    Gilead, Cipla Ink Deal To End HIV Drug Buyers' Antitrust Suit

    Gilead Sciences Inc. and generics maker Cipla told a California federal judge Friday they've reached a settlement ending a proposed class action filed by a public employees' health insurance fund over an alleged anti-competitive patent deal to delay the launch of a generic version of the HIV drug Truvada.

  • March 01, 2024

    DC Circ. Enforces UAW Bargaining Order With Auto Parts Co.

    The National Labor Relations Board correctly found that an automotive parts manufacturer stalled and improperly withdrew recognition from a United Auto Workers local after union certification, the D.C. Circuit ruled Friday, denying the company's request to challenge the ruling and granting the board's bid to enforce it.

  • March 01, 2024

    Atty Censured Over Conduct In NFL Concussion MDL

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has rejected objections from a law firm and its principal and affirmed a special masters' determination that the attorney be censured for engaging in "questionable behavior" while trying to secure monetary awards for clients from the NFL players' concussion injury litigation settlement.

  • March 01, 2024

    Aon, Transport Co. To Pay $9M To End Workers' ERISA Suit

    A transportation company and its investment consultant will foot a $9 million bill to end a class action accusing them of running afoul of federal benefits law by replacing investment options in the company's retirement plan with subpar funds, according to a filing in Ohio federal court.

  • March 01, 2024

    18-Year Ogletree Shareholder Named ERIC Legal Group Head

    A longtime Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC shareholder has left the firm for a role as executive director of the ERISA Industry Committee's Legal Center, the group announced Friday.

  • February 29, 2024

    Exxon Protected From Plant Fire Suits, Texas Court Rules

    Providing workers' compensation insurance to its subcontractors shielded ExxonMobil Corp. from personal injury lawsuits brought by workers hurt in a fire at one of its petrochemical plants, a Texas appellate court said Thursday, overriding a trial court ruling against the oil giant.

  • February 29, 2024

    Real Estate Tech Co. Opendoor Beats Investor Suit, For Now

    Real estate marketplace giant Opendoor Technologies Inc. has beaten, for now, a suit accusing it of misleading investors about its artificial-intelligence-powered algorithm and ability to remain profitable, with an Arizona federal judge ruling that many of the challenged statements in the suit are not actually false or misleading.

  • February 29, 2024

    Duke Can't Escape Retiree's Mortality Data Lawsuit

    Duke University can't toss a retiree's suit alleging it underpaid former employees millions by using outdated mortality data to calculate their retirement benefits, a North Carolina federal judge said Thursday, ruling that the former worker put forward enough detail showing she was harmed.

  • February 29, 2024

    Insurance Co. Settles Mass. Worker's Long COVID Suit

    Lincoln Life Assurance has agreed to resolve a suit alleging it wrongly cut off disability payments to a worker who was recovering from over a year of debilitating long-term symptoms caused by COVID-19, according to a Thursday order in Massachusetts federal court.

  • February 29, 2024

    Aetna Asks Judge To Force Arbitration In Aramark ERISA Feud

    Aetna Life Insurance Co. says Aramark Services Inc. and its affiliated employee health plans ignored arbitration requirements in their contract when they filed a lawsuit in Texas accusing Aetna of mismanaging Aramark's health insurance claims, and has asked a Connecticut federal court to force the parties to arbitration there.

  • February 29, 2024

    10th Circ. Says NLRB's Remedies 'Inconsistent' With Law

    The National Labor Relations Board surpassed its powers when ordering a concrete company to make pension contributions and profit-sharing payments to workers without factoring in past compensation, the Tenth Circuit ruled, sending the case back to the board for a second look but finding the company violated federal labor law.

  • February 29, 2024

    NJ Panel Says Ex-City Prosecutor Not Eligible For Pension

    A former municipal prosecutor was not a city employee but a professional service provider, a New Jersey appellate panel held Thursday, stripping him of seven years of pension participation and credits.

  • February 29, 2024

    Abortion Coverage Remains Steady Post Dobbs, Survey Says

    Abortion coverage has not been significantly rolled back from the nation's largest employer-sponsored health insurance plans since the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade in 2022, according to a Thursday brief from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

  • February 28, 2024

    SEC Taps Agency Vet To Lead Adviser, Fund Rulemaking Unit

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission announced Wednesday that an agency veteran currently serving as deputy director of the examinations division will be the new head of its investment management division, which oversees the regulation of investment advisers, mutual funds and certain private fund operators.

Expert Analysis

  • Employers, Prep For Shorter Stock Awards Settlement Cycle

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    Companies that provide equity compensation in the form of publicly traded stock will soon have one less day to complete such transactions under U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and Nasdaq rules — so employers should implement expedited equity compensation stock settlement and payroll tax deposit procedures now, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

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    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Navigating ACA Reporting Nuances As Deadlines Loom

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    Stephanie Lowe at Liebert Cassidy walks employers through need-to-know elements of Affordable Care Act reporting, including two quickly approaching deadlines, the updated affordability threshold, strategies for choosing an affordability safe harbor, and common coding pitfalls.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Del. Ruling Stands Out In Thorny Noncompete Landscape

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    In Cantor Fitzgerald v. Ainslie, the Delaware Supreme Court last month upheld the enforceability of forfeiture-for-competition provisions in limited partnership agreements, providing a noteworthy opinion amid a time of increasing disfavor toward noncompetes and following a string of Chancery Court rulings deeming them unreasonable, say Margaret Butler and Steven Goldberg at BakerHostetler.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Verizon Benefits Ruling Clears Up Lien Burden Of Proof

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    A Rhode Island federal court recently ruled that a Verizon benefits plan could not recoup a former employee’s settlement funds from the attorney who represented her in a personal injury case, importantly clarifying two Employee Retirement Income Security Act burden of proof issues that were previously unsettled, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Law.

  • 4 Steps To Navigating Employee Dementia With Care

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    A recent Connecticut suit brought by an employee terminated after her managers could not reasonably accommodate her Alzheimer's-related dementia should prompt employers to plan how they can compassionately address older employees whose cognitive impairments affect their job performance, while also protecting the company from potential disability and age discrimination claims, says Robin Shea at Constangy.

  • Del.'s Tesla Pay Takedown Tells Boards What Not To Do

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    The Delaware Chancery Court’s ruthless dissection of the Tesla board’s extreme departures from standard corporate governance in its January opinion striking down CEO Elon Musk’s $55 billion pay package offers a blow-by-blow guide to mistakes Delaware public companies can avoid when negotiating executive compensation, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

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